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Van de Geijn's Group and Intel Create Affiliation

The Intel® Parallel Computing Centers (Intel® PCC) program is collaborating with ICES' Science of High-Performance Computing Group to enable large computer code performance increases while maintaining code portability.

The Intel® Parallel Computing Centers (Intel® PCC) program is collaborating with ICES' Science of High-Performance Computing (SHPC) Group to enable large computer code performance increases while maintaining code portability.

The Intel® PCC at ICES group will develop novel algorithms and runtime systems for performing tensor contractions on multi- and many-core systems such as Intel® Xeon® and Intel® Xeon Phi™ processors. The algorithms are a critical computational step in high-accuracy quantum chemical calculations necessary to describe fully the structure, kinetics, spectroscopy and other physics of atoms and molecules.

“We hope to leverage several key Intel technologies as we strive to increase efficiency and scalability of quantum chemistry calculations on current and future Intel architectures,” says Devin Matthews, the Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow developing the algorithms under ICES Professor Robert van de Geijn, Director of the SHPC Group.

The Intel® PCC at ICES Group collaboration further enables the momentum of a new industry affiliates program. A growing number of collaborators are seeking to modernize computing applications and share developments through publications, conference presentations, industry showcases, and webinars.

Intel® Parallel Computing Centers are universities, institutions, and labs that are leaders in their field. The primary focus is to modernize applications to increase parallelism and scalability through optimizations that leverage cores, caches, threads, and vector capabilities of microprocessors and coprocessors.

The Science of High-Performance Computing Group focuses on the knowledge that underlies scientific software libraries and makes it systematic. On the one hand, this has facilitated the software architecture of such libraries. On the other hand, this allows for making much of the development of such software mechanical via goal-oriented programming techniques from formal methods and Design-by-Transformation from software engineering.

While the ICES SPHC Group contributes to the foundations of the field, it has also created a new dense linear algebra software stack that can nimbly respond to the rapid changes that computer architecture is experiencing. These software artifacts are available under open software license.


Posted: Jan. 19, 2016