ICES Faculty Books

Ranging from introductory textbooks to compendiums of research, this collection of books represent the prolific writing and knowledge base within the core faculty in ICES. These books are authored, co-authored, edited or co-edited by current ICES core faculty, and are currently in print and offered for sale as new volumes. Available on www.amazon.com, they serve to advance computational science and engineering in a broad range of applications.

  • Additional Information

    The finite element method is a numerical method widely used in engineering. Experience shows that unreliable computation can lead to very serious consequences. Hence reliability questions stand are at the forefront of engineering and theoretical interests. This book presents the mathematical theory of the finite element method and is the first to focus on the questions of how reliable computed results really are. It addresses among other topics the local behaviour, errors caused by pollution, superconvergence, and optimal meshes. Many computational examples illustrate the importance of the theoretical conclusions for practical computations. Graduate students, lecturers, and researchers in mathematics, engineering, and scientific computation will benefit from the clear structure of the book, and will find this a very useful reference.

  • Abstract

    The finite element method is a numerical method widely used in engineering. Experience shows that unreliable computation can lead to very serious consequences. Hence reliability questions stand are at the forefront of engineering and theoretical interests. This book presents the mathematical theory of the finite element method and is the first to focus on the questions of how reliable computed results really are. It addresses among other topics the local behaviour, errors caused by pollution, superconvergence, and optimal meshes. Many computational examples illustrate the importance of the theoretical conclusions for practical computations. Graduate students, lecturers, and researchers in mathematics, engineering, and scientific computation will benefit from the clear structure of the book, and will find this a very useful reference.

  • Additional Information

    Most books on finite elements are devoted either to mathematical theory or to engineering applications--but not to both. Finite Elements: An Introduction to the Method and Error Estimation, by Ivo Babuska, John J. Whiteman, and Theofanis Strouboulis, seeks to bridge this gap by presenting the main theoretical ideas of the finite element method and the analysis of its errors in an accessible way. At the same time, it also presents computed numbers, which not only illustrate the theory but can only be analyzed using the theory. This approach, both dual and interacting between theory and computation makes this book unique. Much research is currently being done into reliability in computational modelling, involving both validation of the mathematical models and verification of the numerical schemes. By treating finite element error analysis in this way this book is a significant contribution to the verification process of finite element modelling in the context of reliability.

  • Abstract

    Most books on finite elements are devoted either to mathematical theory or to engineering applications--but not to both. Finite Elements: An Introduction to the Method and Error Estimation, by Ivo Babuska, John J. Whiteman, and Theofanis Strouboulis, seeks to bridge this gap by presenting the main theoretical ideas of the finite element method and the analysis of its errors in an accessible way. At the same time, it also presents computed numbers, which not only illustrate the theory but can only be analyzed using the theory. This approach, both dual and interacting between theory and computation makes this book unique.

    Much research is currently being done into reliability in computational modelling, involving both validation of the mathematical models and verification of the numerical schemes. By treating finite element error analysis in this way this book is a significant contribution to the verification process of finite element modelling in the context of reliability.

  • Additional Information

    This book deals with the impact of uncertainty in input data on the outputs of mathematical models. Uncertain inputs as scalars, tensors, functions, or domain boundaries are considered. In practical terms, material parameters or constitutive laws, for instance, are uncertain, and quantities as local temperature, local mechanical stress, or local displacement are monitored. The goal of the worst scenario method is to extremize the quantity over the set of uncertain input data. A general mathematical scheme of the worst scenario method, including approximation by finite element methods, is presented, and then applied to various state problems modeled by differential equations or variational inequalities: nonlinear heat flow, Timoshenko beam vibration and buckling, plate buckling, contact problems in elasticity and thermoelasticity with and without friction, and various models of plastic deformation, to list some of the topics. Dozens of examples, figures, and tables are included. Although the book concentrates on the mathematical aspects of the subject, a substantial part is written in an accessible style and is devoted to various facets of uncertainty in modeling and to the state of the art techniques proposed to deal with uncertain input data. A chapter on sensitivity analysis and on functional and convex analysis is included for the reader's convenience. - Rigorous theory is established for the treatment of uncertainty in modeling - Uncertainty is considered in complex models based on partial differential equations or variational inequalities - Applications to nonlinear and linear problems with uncertain data are presented in detail: quasilinear steady heat flow, buckling of beams and plates, vibration of beams, frictional contact of bodies, several models of plastic deformation, and more - Although emphasis is put on theoretical analysis and approximation techniques, numerical examples are also present - Main ideas and approaches used today to handle uncertainties in modeling are described in an accessible form - Fairly self-contained book

  • Abstract

    This book deals with the impact of uncertainty in input data on the outputs of mathematical models. Uncertain inputs as scalars, tensors, functions, or domain boundaries are considered. In practical terms, material parameters or constitutive laws, for instance, are uncertain, and quantities as local temperature, local mechanical stress, or local displacement are monitored. The goal of the worst scenario method is to extremize the quantity over the set of uncertain input data.

    A general mathematical scheme of the worst scenario method, including approximation by finite element methods, is presented, and then applied to various state problems modeled by differential equations or variational inequalities: nonlinear heat flow, Timoshenko beam vibration and buckling, plate buckling, contact problems in elasticity and thermoelasticity with and without friction, and various models of plastic deformation, to list some of the topics. Dozens of examples, figures, and tables are included.

    Although the book concentrates on the mathematical aspects of the subject, a substantial part is written in an accessible style and is devoted to various facets of uncertainty in modeling and to the state of the art techniques proposed to deal with uncertain input data.

    A chapter on sensitivity analysis and on functional and convex analysis is included for the reader's convenience.

    • Rigorous theory is established for the treatment of uncertainty in modeling
    • Uncertainty is considered in complex models based on partial differential equations or variational inequalities
    • Applications to nonlinear and linear problems with uncertain data are presented in detail: quasilinear steady heat flow, buckling of beams and plates, vibration of beams, frictional contact of bodies, several models of plastic deformation, and more
    • Although emphasis is put on theoretical analysis and approximation techniques, numerical examples are also present
    • Main ideas and approaches used today to handle uncertainties in modeling are described in an accessible form
    • Fairly self-contained book
  • Additional Information

    Whenever numerical simulation is employed in connection with engineering decision-making, there is an implied expectation of reliability: one cannot base decisions on computed information without believing that information is reliable enough to support those decisions. Using mathematical models to show the reliability of computer-generated information is an essential part of any modelling effort. Giving users of finite element analysis (FEA) software an introduction to verification and validation procedures, this book thoroughly covers the fundamentals of assuring reliability in numerical simulation. The renowned authors systematically guide readers through the basic theory and algorithmic structure of the finite element method, using helpful examples and exercises throughout. Delivers the tools needed to have a working knowledge of the finite element method Illustrates the concepts and procedures of verification and validation Explains the process of conceptualization supported by virtual experimentation Describes the convergence characteristics of the h-, p- and hp-methods Covers the hierarchic view of mathematical models and finite element spaces Uses examples and exercises which illustrate the techniques and procedures of quality assurance Ideal for mechanical and structural engineering students, practicing engineers and applied mathematicians Includes parameter-controlled examples of solved problems in a companion website (www.wiley.com/go/szabo)

  • Abstract

    Whenever numerical simulation is employed in connection with engineering decision-making, there is an implied expectation of reliability: one cannot base decisions on computed information without believing that information is reliable enough to support those decisions. Using mathematical models to show the reliability of computer-generated information is an essential part of any modelling effort.

    Giving users of finite element analysis (FEA) software an introduction to verification and validation procedures, this book thoroughly covers the fundamentals of assuring reliability in numerical simulation. The renowned authors systematically guide readers through the basic theory and algorithmic structure of the finite element method, using helpful examples and exercises throughout.

    Delivers the tools needed to have a working knowledge of the finite element method
    Illustrates the concepts and procedures of verification and validation
    Explains the process of conceptualization supported by virtual experimentation
    Describes the convergence characteristics of the h-, p- and hp-methods
    Covers the hierarchic view of mathematical models and finite element spaces
    Uses examples and exercises which illustrate the techniques and procedures of quality assurance
    Ideal for mechanical and structural engineering students, practicing engineers and applied mathematicians
    Includes parameter-controlled examples of solved problems in a companion website (www.wiley.com/go/szabo)

  • Additional Information

    Covers the fundamentals of linear theory of finite elements, from both mathematical and physical points of view. Major focus is on error estimation and adaptive methods used to increase the reliability of results. Incorporates recent advances not covered by other books.

  • Abstract

    Covers the fundamentals of linear theory of finite elements, from both mathematical and physical points of view. Major focus is on error estimation and adaptive methods used to increase the reliability of results. Incorporates recent advances not covered by other books.