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ICES News

Hughes gives international plenary lectures Hughes gives international plenary lectures

ICES Professor Thomas J.R. Hughes has given three national and international plenary lectures in the past three months.

Most recently he gave the Invited Lecture to the Full Assembly of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Gesamt Akademie) in Vienna, October 16. The lecture was entitled “Patient Specific Computer Modeling and the Predictive Paradigm in Cardiovascular Medicine.”

On September 1 Hughes was in Barcelona, Spain to give the Keynote Plenary Lecture for the XIII International Conference on Computational Plasticity, Fundamentals and Applications, COMPLAS XIII. It was entitled “Isogeometric Phase-field Modeling of Brittle and Ductile Fracture.” Read more.

Posted: Oct. 28, 2015
Bajaj gives talk to International Meshing Roundtable Bajaj gives talk to International Meshing Roundtable

ICES Professor Chandrajit Bajaj gave the banquet talk at Sandia National Laboratories' 24th Annual International Meshing Roundtable Oct. 13.

Bajaj spoke to nature's abundance of meshes that it uses to refine its form and function models through its own multi-scale, multi-chemistry/physics simulations. His use of rich visuals offered what he called "a few but surprising examples of nature’s geometric dexterity and some of the lessons we continue to learn from it." Read more.

Posted: Oct. 22, 2015
Tumor-Modeling Group Seeks to Improve Tumor Forecasting with New Collaborations Tumor-Modeling Group Seeks to Improve Tumor Forecasting with New Collaborations

Over the past decade the ICES tumor-modeling group has been using computational methods to model cancer treatment.

Led by ICES Director Tinsley Oden, the group’s focus on modeling prostate cancer and how it responds to laser ablation has helped refine laser therapies to more effectively destroy cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy surrounding tissue.

But the team’s latest research venture into cancer has a different objective—instead of modeling how cancer cells respond to therapy, they’re first seeking to model how they thrive in their native environment. Read more.

Posted: Oct. 22, 2015
Vote for Dawson's work in the Texas Research Showdown Vote for Dawson's work in the Texas Research Showdown

Voting is underway for ICES Professor Clint Dawson's work through the Texas Research Showdown.

The Showdown is a video and presentation competition for undergraduate researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. In the first round, students create 2-minute videos about their research, which are voted on by UT students.

Plan II senior Joseph Moon has entered a video in the competition featuring oil spill simulation research undertaken in Professor Dawson's lab. Read more.

Posted: Oct. 15, 2015
Celebrating Bjorn Engquist: Pushing Boundaries with Numerical Analysis Celebrating Bjorn Engquist: Pushing Boundaries with Numerical Analysis

Bjorn Engquist says that if you ask a mathematician to categorize Bjorn’s work, she will say that it is applied. Her rationale is that the differential equations he’s studied over the years are used to describe phenomena like seismic wave propagation or the flow of air around an object.

But Engquist, recently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, says that if you ask an engineer the same question, he will respond that Bjorn’s work is theoretical. Although Engquist has developed mathematics that have found their way into engineering software used by geophysicists, telecommunication experts, and aerospace engineers, he’s not interested in parsing company numbers. Read more.

Posted: Oct. 13, 2015