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ICES News

Post Doc Matthews garners second national award Post Doc Matthews garners second national award

Devin Matthews, a postdoctoral researcher with ICES Professors Robert van de Geijn and John Stanton, has been selected as an inaugural recipient of the 2015 Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellows Award.

The annual award supports postdoctoral fellows "who are judged to have the highest potential for success in a career in chemistry and the life sciences, and who will become the next generation of leaders and innovators in science, engineering, and technology."

"We hope this award will be the catalyst to help with your transition to an outstanding, independent research career," said Anne Hultgren, executive director of the foundation. Read more.

Posted: July 30, 2015
Dawson's hurricane models to benefit from $13.7 Million NSF Grant for Natural Hazards Engineering Center Dawson's hurricane models to benefit from $13.7 Million NSF Grant for Natural Hazards Engineering Center

ICES Professor Clint Dawson will lend his hurricane modeling expertise to a new cyberinfrastructure effort funded by a $13.7 million grant from the National Science Foundation. The grant will help engineers build safer structures that can better withstand natural hazards such as earthquakes and windstorms.

The Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is leading the effort to build a software platform, data repository and tools that will help the United States design more resilient buildings, levees and other public infrastructure that could protect lives, property and communities. Read more.

Posted: July 21, 2015
Soares' Simulation Shows How to Grow Better Engineered Tissue Soares' Simulation Shows How to Grow Better Engineered Tissue

Mechanical stimulation of tissue during in vitro incubation and early tissue development are an increasingly important tool in bioengineering. It exposes engineered tissues to physical forces similar to those experienced in a living body by mechanically pulling and flexing the scaffolds where they’re grown.

Joao Soares, a postdoctoral researcher working in the ICES Center for Cardiovascular Simulation (CCS), and Michael Sacks have developed a novel theoretical framework for engineered tissues that simulates the mechanisms that control cell and tissue growth under mechanical training. Read more.

Posted: July 8, 2015
Sacks gives keynote lecture at international conference Sacks gives keynote lecture at international conference

ICES Professor Michael Sacks gave the keynote lecture at the International Conference on Computational, Mathematical, and Biomedical Engineering in Cachan, France.

His lecture, entitled "On the development of an anatomical, structural, and biomechanical integrated model of the mitral valve," presented state-of-the-art of mitral valve modeling techniques, with an emphasis on what is known and investigated at various length scales. Read more.

Posted: July 7, 2015
New Computer Tool Improves Artery Disease Management New Computer Tool Improves Artery Disease Management

A new, non-invasive diagnostic tool could make it easier, cheaper and safer to diagnose and treat peripheral artery disease (PAD), a condition that affects more than 200 million people worldwide.

A breakthrough computational tool uses non-invasive measurements obtained from the MRIs of a patient’s blood vessels coupled with blood flow rates to predict treatment outcomes, as described in the April 15 edition of the Royal Society’s technical journal, Interface. Lead authors were University of Texas at Austin Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) Research Fellow Shaolie Hossain and ICES Professor Thomas J. R. Hughes. Read more.

Posted: June 30, 2015