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Pingali gives four international keynote addresses in 2015 Pingali gives four international keynote addresses in 2015

ICES Professor Keshav Pingali gave four international keynote speeches and two distinguished university lectures in 2015.

Most recently he served as the keynote speaker at the International Conference on Parallel Computing, ParCo 2015, in Edinburgh, September 2015.

He was in Greece as the keynote speaker for the international Conference on Embedded Computer Systems: Architectures, Modeling, and Simulation SAMOS 2015, July 2015. Read more.

Posted: Jan. 11, 2016
Chelikowsky organizes Tel Aviv workshop Chelikowsky organizes Tel Aviv workshop

ICES Professor Jim Chelikowsky served as an organizer for the December workshop "Real-space formalism within the PARSEC code: perspectives and future development."

Held at Tel Aviv University Dec. 13-17, the workshop invited 15 speakers from throughout the world to offer tutorials, lectures, and simulation exercises. Read more.

Posted: Jan. 11, 2016
From intern to graduate student: ICES summer internship opened door to research for CSEM student From intern to graduate student: ICES summer internship opened door to research for CSEM student

John Hawkins, a Ph.D. student in the ICES Computational Science, Engineering and Mathematics program, spends his days researching how proteins bind to DNA, one of the most fundamental questions in biology and a process that requires analyzing millions of reads of DNA fragments—an issue in data analysis.

“Making things bind to other things is a very useful thing to know how to do in molecular biosciences,” Hawkins said. “But the current stage we’re at in this project is a lot of data analysis—a big data problem—where we have two very large data sets, millions of short reads of DNA and a large number of images where we are trying to find where each sequence aligns in each image.” Read more.

Posted: Jan. 7, 2016
Mary Wheeler awarded $1.5 million NSF grant to develop more efficient, realistic fracturing simulations Mary Wheeler awarded $1.5 million NSF grant to develop more efficient, realistic fracturing simulations

Professor Mary Wheeler, director of the ICES Center for Subsurface Modeling and holder of the Ernest and Virginia Cockrell Chair in Engineering, with her collaborators has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to develop computational techniques that more effectively use big data to predict and model the pathways of naturally-occurring ground fractures and how induced fractures interact with them. Read more.

Posted: Dec. 8, 2015
ICES hosts Spring Computational Medicine Lectures ICES hosts Spring Computational Medicine Lectures

Beginning Jan. 8, ICES will host its first in a series of nine lectures by world leaders in computational medicine.

Alison Marsden, associate professor of pediatrics and of bioengineering at Stanford University, will be the inaugural speaker in the series, which seeks to highlight computational medicine's critical contributions to advancing healthcare.

"Computational Medicine is an emerging field that uses computer modeling, simulation, and data analysis to promote advances in prognosis, therapies, non-invasive diagnostic methods, and personalized medicine,” says Michael Sacks, ICES professor of biomedical engineering and an organizer of the series. Read more.

Posted: Dec. 7, 2015